Recent Updates

Late Burndown in Soybean

Picture 1. 3 foot tall goosegrass, fall panicum and Palmer amaranth that need to be burndown before soybean planting

The question of the week is on how to burndown fields that are grown up messes before planting soybeans (Picture 1).  The problem is when fields are heavily infested with 3’ tall goosegrass, Palmer amaranth, horseweed and volunteer corn that is tasseling there are no good answers. Continue reading

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Nitrogen loss potential in wet corn fields

From late April and throughout the month of May, many parts of Middle and West TN have received persistent rainfall that is well above the average for this period. These rains have produced persistently wet soil conditions and have coincided with sidedress N fertilizer application where most or all of the recommended N is applied. With this much rain, there is potential for N loss. Continue reading

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Managing Palmer Amaranth and Grass Burndown Escapes

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Picture 1. Grass and Palmer amaranth escaping paraquat burndown in emerged cotton

There have been numerous fields where goosegrass, junglerice and Palmer amaranth were not controlled at burndown and the crop has emerged.  In some cases, the wet weather delayed burndown to where Palmer amaranth and those grasses were too large to be effectively controlled with one pass of Gramoxone (Picture 1).  In other cases, tillage used to help speed up field drying or to build beds partially buried pigweed and grasses which make effective burndown from Gramoxone very problematic (Picture 2). In a few cases, dicamba and glyphosate were used for burndown and they did not control those weeds due to resistance (Picture 3). Continue reading

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Pre-Emerge Herbicide Injury in Soybean

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The call of the last week was Pre-emerge herbicide injury in soybeans.  Several folks reported that their soybeans were “going backwards”. This is not a surprise as in wetter springs the probability of seeing injury from Pre-applied herbicides is greatly increased. That coupled with an increase in soybean acres this spring would increase the probability of herbicide injury in that crop. I would expect more of the same as we move into June with all the rain in the past few days.

Picture 1. Metribuzin injury on soybean

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Yield potential and management of late planted cotton

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In almost every cotton-related conversation I had during early May, the conversation quickly turned to our excellent early planting window- a window which opened earlier in 2024 than any of recent memory.  Since then, most have fought to find an opportunity to mud in any acres and many are now considering shifting some farms to soybeans.  In this blog, I attempt to cover yield potential of a late planted cotton crop and highlight several very important factors to consider when planting cotton at the end of our ‘normal’ planting window. Continue reading

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Fomesafen Carryover into Corn and Grain Sorghum

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Carryover injury from fomesafen (Flexstar, Prefix, Reflex, Intimidator, Marvel, Dawn, Rhythm, etc.) is starting to show in a few corn fields.  This is because some  applications in late June and July in 2023 coupled with a very dry fall allowed the herbicide to persist into winter.  Recent rains then allow any herbicide carryover to more completely get into the soil solution.

Fomesafen carryover injury in corn and grain sorghum looks similar.  Expect to see stunting and interveinal chlorosis as pictures below sent from crop consultants clearly shows.

Striping of corn leaf veins characteristic of fomesafen carryover

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