Category Archives: Cotton

Basics of the CFAP Direct Payments for Corn, Soybean, and Cotton

Posted for Dr. Aaron Smith, Associate Professor and Extension Economist, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

The USDA has started accepting applications for CFAP payments to producers that have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Continue reading

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Reminder – UT Cotton Scout School (8:30, Friday May 29th via Zoom)

Because of the COVID-19 situation, the 2020 UT Cotton Scout School will be held by webinar (via Zoom) on May 29th, beginning at 8:30 AM and ending by Noon. Participants will be required to preregister to receive the Zoom password to enter the meeting. To preregister, please email LaDonn Kelso at dkelso2@utk.edu. She will reply to your message with the Zoom meeting password.

Pesticide re-certification points and Continue reading

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Cotton Producers’ Prevented Planting Decision

Christopher N. Boyer, Tyson B. Raper, and S. Aaron Smith

May 20th (Final Planting date) has come and gone and June 4th (End of Late Planting) is around the corner for cotton producers. If you haven’t planted yet and have Revenue Protection or Yield Protection insurance policies, there are four options:

  1. Plant cotton in the late planting period. This option comes with reduced insurance; the farmer’s production guarantee would decrease 1% per day, for each day of delay after the final planting date until the crop is planted or the end of the late planting period. Production guarantee is the guaranteed revenue amount offered by a crop insurance provider and is calculated by multiplying guaranteed insurance price by actual production history (APH) yield, which is a 4 to 10-year trend adjusted average yield used for future crop insurance purchases, by insurance coverage level.
  2. Take the full prevented planting payment. The full prevented planting payment is the farmer’s production guarantee multiplied by the prevented planting coverage factor. The prevented planting coverage factor for cotton is 50%. This option requires leaving the land fallow or planting a summer cover crop after the late planting period that cannot be harvested or grazed before November 1st. This option does not impact the producer’s APH.
  3. Receive a 35% of their full prevented planting payment for cotton and switch to a second crop. If a partial indemnity payment was received for the first crop, the second crop will be uninsured, and a farmer must wait until after the late planting period for the first crop to plant the second crop.
  4. Forgo the prevented planting payment for cotton and plant a second crop. If a farmer did not receive an indemnity payment for the first crop, they can switch their insurance to a second crop and plant immediately.

In this report, we examine each of these alternatives by assessing the profit-maximizing option using historical crop yield data, and also lay out information producers should consider if they are faced with a prevented planting decision.  Continue reading

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Cotton yield potential and planting date

With the majority of our cotton acreage yet to be planted, many have asked how late should I plant?  To answer that question, you must estimate current lint yield potential.  Dr. Shawn Butler, who recently finished his PhD in the UT Cotton Agronomy Program, compiled data from 10 field trials in Tennessee, Mississippi and Missouri to assist those interested in estimating lint yield potential based on planting date and plant population (not seeding rate, but actual plants emerged per acre). The figure above was generated with that data.

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Reports of freeze/frost damage to wheat becoming more common

Reports of blanks in wheat heads began trickling in last week and by this week became common.  The impacted areas appear to run northeast from Hardeman/Fayette Counties through Madison county and into Henry County.  The injury I’ve observed has ranged from light to severe, with the worst injury appearing on acres that were planted in early October.  From the windshield, the injury will likely not be noticeable; at a distance, the wheat may simply appear to be maturing rapidly (see image above).  Estimated yield loss from the picture above equaled 40%.  Continue reading

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Moth Trapping Data

Corn earworm (bollworm) moth

A reminder that moth trapping data are updated weekly at http://www.utcrops.com/BlogStuff/2020MothTrappingData.pdf, and you can also access these data on the Quick Links of this site.  Pheromone-baited traps are run for corn earworm (bollworm), tobacco budworm, and southwestern corn borer.

Currently, moth trap catches are generally low, as typically observed this time of year.

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