Category Archives: Irrigation

Virtual Milan No-till Field Day … Available Now!

Follow the link below to experience the 2020 Milan No-till Field Day at your own pace! You can watch an entire tour by clicking on its name, or just one presentation by clicking on a specific title.

Please note, all links will open in a new tab. Closed captions are available by clicking the “CC” button on the right side of the video’s play bar.

Research Tours

 

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Cotton growth stages and water requirements

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While May brought a great deal of rain, June and July have been dry for much of West Tennessee.  We are already beginning to see the impacts on cotton growth and development.  While we still have very good cotton yield potential, we need a good soaking rain in the coming weeks.  This blog highlights impacts of drought on cotton during the growth stage, provides general information on scheduling irrigation and highlights a few scheduling methods.

Ideally, the soil profile needs to provide sufficient plant available water throughout the blooming period. As we begin to move towards the permanent wilting point during the blooming window, fruit retention may begin to decline and maturity may be delayed.  If a rainfall or irrigation event does not ameliorate the stress, yield penalties may develop.  Cotton plants are particularly susceptible to drought during the early boll development stages which immediately follow flowering (Table 1). Keeping soil profile at or near field capacity at early bloom through peak bloom will support earliness and maximize yields.

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Recording of 2020 UT Soybean Scout School

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Below is a link to the recorded presentation of the 2020 UT Soybean Scout School that was presented today via Zoom. Set aside a little time if you intend to watch. Also keep in mind that much of the same information is available on our other internet resources including http://utcrops.com/soybean/VSSchool.htm and https://guide.utcrops.com/soybean/.

Recording of Soybean Scout School (1h 46 min)

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Field Days – Water Management and Sensor Demonstration for Soybean (Next Week)

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A field tours of water management and sensor demonstrations in soybean are planned for nest week (see below).  Please navigate to the following page for more details about times, locations and registration information – https://ag.tennessee.edu/BESS/Pages/Sensor-Comparison.aspx.

  • July 30 – West TN Research and Education Center (field tour and in-service training)
  • August 1 – Weakley Co. (sensor demonstration)
  • August 2 – Fayette/Hardeman Co. (sensor demonstration)

 

 

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Reminder – Soybean Scout School This Week (7/17) in Dyersburg

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UT’s Soybean Scout Schools will be held in July (see below). These field-side programs cover the basics of soybean growth, scouting, pest identification, and general management. Pesticide recertification and CCA CEU points will be available. Scout Schools are offered free of charge with sponsorship from the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board. Registration is not required. Participants will receive a scouting notebook and a sweep net while supplies last. Continue reading

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Corn and Cotton Producers’ Prevented Planting Decision

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Federal crop insurance programs have a prevented planting provision that can protect producers from the financial losses and risks associated with not being able to plant the intended crop within the desired planting period. Revenue Protection, Revenue Protection with Harvest Price Exclusion, Yield Protection, and Area Risk Protection insurance policies pay indemnities if producers were unable to plant the insured crop by a designated final planting date or within any applicable late planting period due to natural causes, typically drought or excess moisture. This post highlights several components of those provisions and provides a few examples.  

Kevin Adkins, Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee

**Christopher N. Boyer, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee 302-I Morgan Hall Knoxville, TN 37996 Phone: 865-974-7468 Email: cboyer3@utk.edu **Corresponding author Continue reading

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