Category Archives: Corn

2019 County Standardized Trials Corn Data

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The 2019 County Standardized Trials data are now available. This year, 58 hybrids were evaluated with 49 test locations being harvested.  A great corn year brings the overall average across all locations and hybrids to 206 bu/ac.  The tables are separated into 3 maturity groups, early <114 day, medium 114-116 day, and full >116 day corn.  Hybrids are listed in descending order within each maturity across locations.  UT recommends selecting hybrids that are in the A group statistically. Hybrids with *’s next to their name, have been in the A group for consecutive years.  Two (**)  indicate this hybrid has been in the A group for 3 consecutive years.

A special thanks to those companies involved in these trials for sending a great lineup.  Thank you to all the county agents involved in getting these trials in and out.  Thank you especially to the producers who allow these trials to be placed in their fields to provide all of Tennessee with a non-bias look at head to head yield comparisons across the state.

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Tennessee Corn Grain REC Data Now Available

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Our county corn trial numbers are still rolling in, but results are up for the small plot trials performed at the University of Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center locations. Results can be found at search.utcrops.com/corn-grains as both web tables or as a downloadable excel file. These tables will be updated with county data as soon as that is available.

AgResearch and Education Center (REC) plots are 5 ft (2, 30 in rows) by 30 ft and are replicated three times per location. Total number of entries was on par with most years, totaling 89 corn hybrids, representing 14 company/brands. Continue reading

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2019 Tennessee Corn Silage Hybrid Trial

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Our 2019 Tennessee corn silage hybrid trial report is now available on search.utcrops.com/corn-silage. We had fewer hybrids than usual this year and all produced similar yields, averaging 8.4 tons/ac dry weight. Differences did show in terms of quality, however, with some hybrids producing significantly higher milk/ton. Mean separation (MS) values help us identify statistical differences between hybrids. Look for the “A” group to identify hybrids that were top performers within each trait. If looking at the online tables, be sure to scroll right to see all of the quality and agronomic traits evaluated.  Online tables can be found here or download the pdf and/or excel tables.

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Cover Crop Species Selection for Tennessee Corn and Soybean Systems

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In Tennessee, corn harvest is beginning and soybeans will be right around the corner. Time to start talking about cover crops, in particular, what options are best for your cropping system. Cover crops offer many benefits to cash crop systems, including weed suppression, nutrient credits, improved soil health, pollinator habitat, and more. Many species can be used as cover crops but each differs in the ecological benefits it can provide to a system as well as in its adaptation to production regions in Tennessee.  This adaption is highly dependent on management practices, especially time of planting. A species selected as a top performer when planted after corn may not do so well in a system following soybeans, where cover crop planting is two to four weeks later. Planting a poorly adapted species reduces your return on investment in a cover cropping system, so let’s talk about what works in Tennessee. Continue reading

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Insect Calls of the Week (July 3, 2019)

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Clouded plant bug adult

Plant bugs … I’d classify the overall plant bug pressure in cotton as average, although we are seeing a few more clouded plant bugs than in recent years. Until bolls are present, count tarnished and clouded plant bugs the same. Once bolls are present, I suggest counting clouded plant bugs as equivalent to 1.5 tarnished plant bugs when making a treatment decision, primarily because clouded plant bugs are more inclined to feed on bolls.  As cotton begins blooming, Continue reading

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