Category Archives: Cotton

Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat were up for the week. Prices continued to move upward this week with corn leading the way. In Tennessee, harvest cash forward contracts, at the end of the week averaged $4.00 and $10.42, for corn and soybeans, respectively. These prices are substantially higher than many predictions by analysts this winter. So what has precipitated this reversal in price direction and price expectation? Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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UT Crop Market Update 5/26/2016

Author: Danny Morris, Ext Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn: September corn futures closed at their highest levels so far this year. It is hard to believe that $4.00 is finally here. After all, it was not that long ago that this price level seemed unobtainable. The combination of a few factors such as higher soybean prices, increased involvement of fund trading, and a weaker dollar have contributed to higher prices. Continue reading

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Reminder – Cotton Scout School this Friday (May 27)

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

The UT Cotton Scout School will be held on Friday, May 27th in Room A at the West Tennessee Research and Education Center (605 Airways Blvd, Jackson). Registration will begin at 8:00 AM with the official program starting at 8:30. The program will end with a lunch, but those interested can attend a short  ‘go to the field’ session after lunch. Topics will include crop development, insect and weed identification, scouting techniques, and more. No registration fee or preregistration is required.

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Comment Period on Proposed Dicamba label for Roundup Xtend Crops is Ending

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

The end of the EPA open comment period for registration of dicamba (specifically the product M1691) on Roundup Xtend cotton and soybean is May 31st.  I just checked and there is well over 4000 comments to date.  I opened a few and many are favorable and there are a good number that are not.  I know we are in the middle of planting but it might be good to let your opinion be heard as well. Continue reading

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Crop Progress – NASS Tennessee

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

COOLER TEMPERATURES CAUSE CONCERNS

While a cold front brought some much-needed rain to parts of Tennessee, the cooler temperatures associated with it caused concern for their emerging crops among row crop farmers. Cotton especially needed warmer temperatures. Livestock producers were busy with hay harvest until the rain. Cattle and pastures were still in good shape. There were 4.7 days suitable for field work. Continue reading at TN_05_23_16.

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Ryegrass infested wheat field gibson county, tn 2016

Ryegrass Questions and Management

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

Clearly, one weed many have had trouble with in 2016 is ryegrass.  Questions began a couple months ago and continue today.  They have ranged from tactics to burn ryegrass down before planting to how to control it in a standing corn crop and more recently, where did all that ryegrass come from that is in my wheat?  Continue reading

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Making the decision to replant in 2016

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist No Comments
The 2016 window for planting cotton in Tennessee has been a mixed bag.  Warm weather in late April let soil temperatures reach 70 degrees in some areas but several cool spells, including one which might even be deemed a ‘blackberry winter’, quickly dropped soil ‎temperatures back into a more-marginal range.  Unfortunately, some areas also experienced packing rains followed by windy, dry conditions which led to crusting.  Most areas have remained wet enough to allow seedlings to lift through the crust and, in general, we appear to be at a better place in 2016 than we were in 2015 at this point in the season.  Still, several are having to decide whether or not to replant Continue reading
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