Category Archives: Cotton

Wheat Freeze Damage Update, Management and Haylage

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist No Comments

Dr. Tyson Raper and Dr. Gary Bates

Reports of no freeze damage received early last week (3/20) were replaced with reports of slight to severe freeze damage by the end of the week (3/24).  This article describes how to determine damage, what types of damage have been noted, and management of freeze damage wheat. Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat were down for the week. As of March 24, December corn was trading 7 ¾ cents lower than last year; November soybeans were trading 54 ¼ cents higher; December cotton was trading $0.18 cents higher; and wheat was trading 31 ¼ cents lower. Similarly, in Tennessee, September and October/November cash forward contract prices are 5 cents lower and 63 cents higher for corn and soybeans, respectively.

 
Planting is quickly approaching and with substantially higher relative prices to corn it is likely that cotton and soybean acreage will see increased acreage nationally. Relative prices are only one of the factors (all though a very important one) that producers consider when determining which crops they will plant. Other important considerations include: relative changes in the cost of production, adherence to crop rotations, expected yields, anticipated weather, and planting conditions. Typically if planting conditions are good early in the planting interval corn acreage increases. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights. 

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What is a ‘breakeven price’ really and what should yours be for 2017?

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Every year I get calls from producers asking what should be their breakeven price.

While this is a number I generate monthly for profitability update reports, it really is a generic number. Each producer should have their own breakeven price number that they calculate based on their operation. While Extension coworkers and colleagues across Tennessee and other states can assist in the calculation, there will be wide variations among producers. There will be differences between operations among the basic inputs of seed, fertilizer, herbicide, insecticide, fungicide as well as fuel, repairs and labor. Each operation will have a different cost structure based on how and where inputs are purchased. The differences in input costs are really not the differences I get concerned with in calculating breakeven prices or yields. Continue reading at Southeast Farm Press.

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn and cotton were up; soybeans and wheat were down for the week. There were limited gains and losses for the week across all four commodities as most contracts traded flat for the week.

For December corn, early week losses were more than offset by daily gains at the end of the week. Domestic planted acreage, for corn, will be closely watched. If estimates continue to indicate a reduction in corn acreage a moderate rally could occur. This week’s export sales were also a pleasant surprise for prices.

November soybeans continued to slide lower this week and are now 40 cents lower than the start of March. Soybeans continue to face headwinds due to the record South American crop, greater projected planted acreage in the U.S., and a strong USD. There is strong support in the November contract near $9.80. The USDA’s Prospective Plantings report, at the end of the month could provide some additional price volatility. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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Where did the Horseweed go?

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

Where is the horseweed (marestail)?  That has been a common question this March.  I have no data to say exactly but I can speculate.  My thought is that the main event that has limited its germination was the very dry fall and indeed winter of 2016 and 2017. Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on Tennessee Market Highlights

Corn, soybeans, and wheat were down; cotton was mixed for the week.

Thursday’s WASDE report projected a record large soybean crop for Brazil and increased production estimates for South American corn production. Minor adjustments were made to the U.S. domestic balance sheet. The decrease in soybean exports was unexpected at this juncture, however record South American production and a strengthening USD, relative the Brazilian Real, provide some justification for USDA changes.

For corn, compared to last month’s report, domestic supply was unchanged; feed and residual was decreased 50 million bushels and ethanol was increased 50 million (resulting in no changed in domestic use); U.S. ending stocks were unchanged; and foreign stocks were increased 123 million bushels. Currently, global ending stocks are projected at 8.688 billion bushels (2.32 billion in the U.S. and 6.368 billion in foreign stocks), up 4.6% from the previous marketing year. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates

This link to  the March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates contains a summary of the USDA’s monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Domestic balance sheets for corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat are displayed along with price reaction in futures markets for each commodity on the day of the report release. Additionally, supply and demand estimates for key importing and exporting countries are provided for the current month along with change in estimates from the previous report. The Profitability Outlook section contains estimated returns per acre for each commodity for 2017 based on Tennessee state average yield projections and estimated price offerings for 2017(note: cotton prices include a seed and hauling rebate). Variable expenses are based on the University of Tennessee Extension 2017 Row Crop Budgets. Prices are updated monthly; expenses are updated as warranted during the year and may be different than the expenses contained in the 2017 Row Crop Budgets. This section provides an estimation of the current relative profitability amongst major row crops in Tennessee.

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