Category Archives: Cotton

Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

As reported by NASS on July 20, 2015
SOME CROPS STILL UNDER WATER WHILE OTHER AREAS NEED RAIN

Even though some crops are under water from previous floods in the Delta area, topsoil moisture showed a 12 percent increase in the short category statewide and subsoil moisture increased 7 percent in the same category. Even so, most crops are in good to excellent condition. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 19 15.

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Cotton insect strategies during mid to late bloom

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

Most the action is still centered around plant bugs with some stink bugs in the mix.
You will see higher moth catches in our corn earworm (bollworm) moth traps when the data get posted later this week. The last week of July and the first week of August is often the time we start seeing a few bollworm in the mix, particularly on WideStrike cotton. Let’s talk a little strategy for the next 2-3 weeks. Continue reading

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Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

As reported by NASS on July 13, 2015
FLOOD WATERS STILL PRESENT; DELAYING CROP TREATMENTS

Producers along the Delta are still battling flood waters, hoping they will recede soon and allow them to reapply herbicides and fight weeds. There is very little wheat left to be harvested. Rains in other parts of the state have improved corn, cattle, and pasture conditions. However, pinkeye continues to be a challenge. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 12 15.

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hooded sprayer web

Post-Direct and Hooded Mixtures

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off

Many cotton acres are nearing the true “laying it by” application timing.  Given how Palmer amaranth just keeps coming this year these directed applications have become critical for consistent control of glyphosate-resistant (GR) Palmer amaranth.  Continue reading

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Final UT Soybean Scout School – July 14, Robertson County

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist 2 Comments
Soybean Looper
Soybean Looper

The remaining Soybean Scout School is scheduled for 9:30 AM in Robertson County (see below). Scout Schools are 2-2.5 hour, field-side programs about the nuts and bolts of soybean growth and pest management. They are sponsored in part by the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board and the USB. Scouting notebooks and sweep nets will be provided to participants while supplies last. Continue reading

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Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on July 6, 2015
DELTA FARMERS EXPERIENCE FLOODING

Some farmers along the Mississippi River dealt with flooding issues as the river rose. Widespread rains brought much needed moisture to the rest of the state. The heaviest of these rains have diluted applied herbicides, forcing many soybean producers to concentrate on weed control. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 5 15.

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Soybean Acreage Up, Corn Unchanged (June 30 NASS report)

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

Soybeans planted in Tennessee were estimated at 1.85 million acres, up 210,000 acres from 2014. Acres harvested for grain, at 1.82 million acres, was 210,000 acres above a year ago. U.S. soybean planted area for 2015 was estimated at 85.1 million acres, up 2 percent from last year. Area for harvest, at 84.4 million acres, is up 2 percent from 2014. Continue reading at June Acreage Press Release_TN.

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Adult tarnished plant bug

Dealing with plant bugs during early bloom

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off

Tarnished plant bug infestations in pre-flowering cotton have been pretty typical thus far … sporadic infestations with many but not all fields requiring at least one treatment. Realistically, I expect more consistent problems as we move through July. Below are a few thoughts about the best management practices for plant bugs over the next two weeks.

  • Consider using a sweep net and a drop cloth in tandem during early bloom. As we progress further into bloom, I prefer the drop cloth because the population often shifts primarily to immatures. However, the 14 days just before and after bloom is a time where we might see mixed populations of nymphs and adults knock off squares and feeding on small bolls.
  • Continue monitoring square retention in the top five nodes for 10-14 days after first bloom. Monitoring square retention after this point is generally not suggested for a couple of reasons. Later squares will not contribute much to yield. You can also get a ‘bad read’ as squares will naturally shed as the plant develops a fruit load.
  • Treat for plant bugs when infestation levels average 15 or more plant bugs per 100 sweeps or when 3 or more plant bugs per drop cloth. It is very likley a second spray will be needed at a 4-5 day interval if infestations are several times threshold, particularly when the population is composed mostly of immatures.
  • Use the right insecticide! We have several excellent treatment choices for cotton just prior to flowering and during the first two weeks of bloom. This is an good window for the use of 1.5 oz of Transform (1.5 oz/a) or Diamond (4-6 oz/a and usually tank mixed with Orthene/Acephate or Bidrin). Transform and Diamond provide unique modes of action. This is also a time where Acephate (0.67 – 0.75 lb/a) or Bidrin (5-8 oz/a) work well by themselves, although many will reserve the use of these products as tank mix partners with pyrethroids until later in the season when stink bugs and bollworms are a bigger part of the equation.
  • Don’t use the wrong insecticides. Pyrethroid insecticides applied alone will provide little or no control of tarnished plant bug. Also, I suggest laying off neonicotinoid insecticides such as Centric or the imidacloprid products once past first bloom, in part for resistance management but also because they just don’t work as well in this window as immature plant bugs are a growing part of the population.

Note - Bidrin is not labeled for use during the interval of first square to first bloom. Please follow the label restrictions for this and other insecticides.

 

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