Recent Updates

Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn, soybeans, and cotton were up; wheat was down for the week.

Since March 1st, September cash corn prices, in Tennessee, have traded between
$3.37 and $4.12, a range of 75 cents (for reported elevator and barge
point locations). Lower middle Tennessee has had the highest September
cash price offerings ($3.70 to $4.12) while Northwest Tennessee has had the lowest ($3.37 to $4.00). Currently, harvest cash prices are trading in the middle-to upper portion of this 5-month range ($3.72 to $4.01). Given the above average growing conditions
(91% of the corn crop in Tennessee is rated good-to-excellent) producers should consider pricing some additional production. Anticipated above average yields and prices (buoyed be drought concerns in the Northern plains) provide producers an excellent opportunity
to market additional crop at profitable levels. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

Print Friendly

Sugarcane Aphids in Sorghum

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

Just a quick update … sugarcane aphids are now present statewide at some level, and there are some fields where treatment of grain, forage or sweet sorghum is needed. As for insecticide options, only Sivanto prime is labeled for use.  The label in grain and sweet sorghum allows application at rates up to 10.5 oz/acre, however, I suggest a rate of 4 oz/acre.  I’ve had excellent success with this rate.

Print Friendly

Crop Progress – Tennessee and U.S.

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

FARMERS RETURN TO FIELDS

Drier conditions brought high temperatures and allowed farmers back into their fields. Soybean producers were wrapping up planting while corn producers were applying fungicides. Most farmers are reporting that their crops are looking good. The increased moisture levels from recent rains have had a slight adverse effect on tobacco. The higher temperatures slowed pasture growth, but, for the most part, pastures remained in good shape. There were 5.5 days suitable for field work. Topsoil moisture was 4 percent short, 87 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture was 4 percent short, 88 percent adequate and 8 percent surplus. Continue reading at TN_07_17_17.  The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at CropProg-07-17-2017.

Print Friendly