Recent Updates

Research lacking to back claims for foliar-applied fertilizers

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Good article which also applies to Tennessee producers.

Author: Arkansas Row Crops
By Nathan Slaton, Rick Norman, Trent Roberts, Jason Kelley, Jarrod Hardke, Bill Robertson, Jeremy Ross and Leo Espinoza; University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture.

Farmers must ask at least two fundamental questions about every product they are asked to purchase and apply to their crop: What is the frequency of crop response and what is the average yield increase? The answers to these two questions should be based on an adequate amount of unbiased, reputable research. With such a large number of crop yield enhancing products and nutrient solutions formulated for foliar application available there is no way that each product can be thoroughly researched by university scientists. For the record, let’s establish that there is not a university scientist alive that does not want to discover or recommend farming practices and products that enhance grower yields and profits. Continue reading at Arkansas Row Crops.

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Crop Progress – Tennessee and U.S.

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

RAIN NEEDED STATEWIDE

Hot and dry conditions in East Tennessee, combined with little rain, resulted in water shortages in ponds, creeks, and springs. Pastures continued to suffer and accelerated producer concerns that cattle will have to be fed more hay. Lack of rain stressed crops in West Tennessee, where, nonetheless, wheat harvest was wrapping up with better than average yields. Continue reading the Tennessee Crop Progress at TN_06_27_16. The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at  CropProg-06-27-2016.

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Shifting Gears for Plant Bugs

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

We need to make some adjustment in managing plant bugs as we near bloom. Much of the cotton is at or beyond the third week of squaring, and thus, the suggested sweep net threshold can be relaxed to 15 bugs/100 sweeps. However, you should be more aggressive in situations where overall square retention is at or below 80%. Continue reading

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Sugarcane Aphid Update

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

Grain sorghum acres are way down this year, but those who are growing sorghum should start scouting for sugarcane aphids now. Based on my counterparts reports in more southern states, I suspect there are already low numbers of aphids in some fields. This pest thrives in hot weather, so populations can spread and build quickly. Serious infestations that go untreated can cause catastrophic yield loss. Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat were down for the week. Weather and macro-economic factors triggered large declines in grains and oilseeds this week. Increased rain forecasted for most of the Corn Belt and the U.K. vote to leave the E.U. were major market movers this week. Both of these factors will continue to weigh on commodity markets as there is a tremendous amount of uncertainty moving forward for both. Continue reading at http://economics.ag.utk.edu/market/tnmkt/2016/market062416.pdf.

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UT Crop Market Update 6/23/2016

Author: Danny Morris, Ext Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn: Since the market’s open on Monday morning, September corn futures have declined by $0.48. What exactly caused this decline? The short answer to that question is weather. The forecast for the Midwest has improved and the talk of La Nina has started to disappear. It is too early to say whether we have made a good corn crop or not. Continue reading

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Crop Progress – Tennessee and U.S.

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

GREAT PROGRESS MADE WITH WHEAT HARVEST PARTS OF THE STATE NEED RAIN

Continued dry weather over most of the State last week allowed producers to make great harvest progress with wheat and hay, and had the additional effect of preventing producers from planting soybeans following wheat because of the dry soil. With some scattered showers, early planted corn is tasseling while other corn is twisting and beginning to show signs of heat stress. There were 6.2 days suitable for field work. Continue reading the Tennessee Crop Progress at TN_06_20_16. The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at  CropProg-06-20-2016.

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