Recent Updates

Cotton Insect Situation

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

Tarnished plant bug infestations are sporadic and variable, mostly a scout a spray scenario. I’ve had a number of comments, especially from the Mississippi River Bottoms, about seeing more clouded plant bugs than usual. Prior to bloom, I count them as equivalent to tarnished plant bug when sampling and making treatment decisions. Once bolls are present, I suggest counting them as equivalent to 1.5 tarnished plant bugs because they are more inclined to injure bolls. Don’t forget to monitor square retention. The goal is to reach first bloom with at least 80% retention Continue reading

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June 21, 2018 Webinar: Dr. Aaron Smith on Marketing Corn and Soybeans during the Growing Season: 2018 Outlook and Pricing Opportunities

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Dr. Aaron Smith with UT Extension will present a webinar in conjunction with The University of Arkansas on Thursday June 21 at 3 p.m. central time. To register for this free webinar go to http://bit.ly/UAEX-Marketing-Corn-Soybeans-Smith

 Title: Marketing Corn and Soybeans during the Growing Season: 2018 Outlook and Pricing Opportunities

Time: June 21, 2018 3:00 PM in Central Time (US and Canada)

 Presenter: Dr. Aaron Smith, Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee – Recipient 2015 Premier Forecaster Award by the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association Extension Section

 Description: The presentation will examine the current market outlook for corn and soybeans including an overview of global and domestic supply and demand. In-season marketing and risk management strategies and opportunities for corn and soybean producers will be discussed. Lastly, 2018 and 2019 price projections and factors that could influence corn and soybean prices will be presented.

Registration Link: http://bit.ly/UAEX-Marketing-Corn-Soybeans-Smith

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Tennessee Weekly Crop & Weather Report

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

WHEAT HARVEST IN FULL SWING

Spotty showers caused slight delays in wheat and hay harvest, but did not keep farmers from making significant progress. Cotton and soybean producers were busy spraying their crops. High temperatures and humidity continued to put stress on livestock. There were 5.5 days suitable for field work. Topsoil moisture was 1 percent very short, 16 percent short, 78 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture was 2 percent
very short, 14 percent short, 76 percent adequate, and 8 percent surplus. Continue reading at TN_06_18_18. The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at CropProg-06-18-2018.

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UT Soybean Scout Schools in July

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

UT Extension will be hosting three Soybean Scout Schools during July. Final details will be announced later, but these field-side programs last approximately 2.5 hours and cover the basics of soybean growth, scouting, pest identification, and general management.  Pesticide recertification and CCA CEU points will be available. Scout Schools are offered free of charge with sponsorship from the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board. Registration is not required. Participants will receive a scouting notebook and a sweep net while supplies last.

  • July 6 – 9:00 AM at the West Tennessee Research and Education Center, 605 Airways Blvd, Jackson, TN
  • July 9 – 12:30 PM (beginning with a lunch) at 18498 Hwy 64 W, Pulaski, TN
  • July 10 – 9:00 AM at 8303 Clay Gregory Road, Orlinda, TN
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Herbicide injured cotton: Deciding to keep it and management after

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist No Comments

I’ve received several calls this week requesting information on whether or not to keep injured cotton and management after the injury.  In this brief article, I will cover the ‘keep or discard’ decision and briefly cover best management practices after the decision to keep the crop has been made. Depending on your situation, you may need to document the injury and/or keep a portion of the field to determine the yield penalty. That information is beyond the scope of this article but should be available from your insurance agent or attorney.  Continue reading

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Supply and Demand Estimates and Profitability Outlook

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments
The Supply & Demand Estimates and Profitability Outlook is a summary of the USDA’s monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Domestic balance sheets for corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat are displayed along with price reaction in futures markets for each commodity on the day of the report release. Additionally, supply and demand estimates for key importing and exporting countries are provided for the current month along with change in estimates from the previous report. The Profitability Outlook section contains estimated returns per acre for each commodity based  on 2017 Tennessee state average/trend yields and current price offerings (note: cotton prices include a seed and hauling rebate). Variable expenses are based on the University of Tennessee Extension 2018 Row Crop Budgets. Prices are updated monthly; expenses are updated as warranted during the year and may be different than the expenses contained in the 2018 Row Crop Budgets. This section provides an estimation of the current relative profitability among major row crops in Tennessee.
The report is prepared monthly by Dr. Aaron Smith and Chuck Danehower.
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Managing the moving parts of a breakeven price

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

What do you consider the breakeven price to be for a bushel of soybeans?

This was a question posed to candidates at a Tennessee gubernatorial forum in early May in the heart of soybean country in Northwest Tennessee.

Realistically, there is no correct answer but a range of acceptable answers depending on a farmer’s individual situation. Considering there are farmers in Tennessee and the U.S. that may struggle with answering the question, expecting gubernatorial candidates to be on top of such an answer may be a stretch. Regardless, most acquitted themselves well with their answers and did show they realize the importance of soybeans and agriculture in Tennessee. Continue reading at Southeast Free Press.

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