Recent Updates

Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn and wheat were up; soybeans and cotton were down for the week.

For the past three months, harvest corn futures prices have traded between $3.78/bu and $3.95/bu, below the projected price for crop insurance of $3.96/bu established in February. Harvest soybean futures have declined substantially (currently trading at $9.30-$9.40/bu) from the projected crop insurance price of $10.19/bu. For those that have an acceptable level of crop priced (25-65% of anticipated production) a wait and see marketing approach is likely warranted. For those with no crop priced establishing a price on a quarter of estimated production may be worth considering. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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Critters in Our Crops

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

My phone hasn’t been going crazy with critter calls, but slug injury has been the clear winner this week, both in cotton and soybean. I also want to put forth a few reminders about thrips in cotton. Continue reading

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Southwestern Corn Borer in Non-Bt Corn

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments
SWCB Larva (click to enlarge)

Moth traps catches clearly indicate that the first generation flight is peaking (link to moth trap catches). Local moth catches may vary considerably, and that is why we suggest running pheromone traps on your farm if you are growing non-Bt corn. The highest trap catches are on farms in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Refuges, primarily because they are not allowed to grow Bt corn. Please link to the publication below for more information about the management of this pest.  Below, I’ve also provided the suggested treatment threshold for southwestern corn borers in non-Bt corn during the whorl stage. Continue reading

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Follow Up Questions on Reports of Poor Palmer Amaranth Control with Dicamba

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

The blog on inconsistent dicamba performance on Palmer amaranth has caused some follow up questions.

Is there any difference between Engenia, Xtendimax and Clarity for actual Palmer amaranth control? NO. I know from repeated research with all three that they all perform fairly well on a 1 to 4” Palmer amaranth.  They all often need follow up applications on Palmer that is larger than 4”.

Are PRE applied herbicides needed in Xtend soybeans?  YES. The folks to date who have had issues with dicamba performance were not using any PRE applied herbicides. It is hard to get good coverage in those thick mats of pigweeds where PREs have not been used.

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Crop Progress – Tennessee and U.S.

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

CORN PLANTING NEARS COMPLETION

Corn producers were wrapping up planting with some switching planters over to soybeans. High winds hindered spraying and caused lodging in wheat in some areas. Hay cutting was in full swing. Although hay quality was generally good, many producers reported below average yields. Cattle producers reported a few instances of insect pressure on their herds. There were 5.8 days suitable for field work. Topsoil moisture was 1 percent very short, 7 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 13 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture was 5 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 18 percent surplus. Continue reading at TN_05_22_17. The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at CropProg-05-22-2017.

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UT Commodity Market Update 5/23/2017

Author: Danny Morris, Ext Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn: Over the last 30 days, September corn futures have increased by $0.11. The increase can be attributed to the reduction in corn acres for 2017. The low prices of corn futures caused many farmers to increase their bean acres at the expense of corn acres. As a result, corn futures are showing signs of potentially creeping higher through the growing season. Of course, this all hinges upon the growing conditions of the crop. However, the stage has been set for a chance at higher corn prices.

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