All posts by Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist

About Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist

Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist

Visual Symptoms: A Handy Tool in Identifying Nutrient Deficiency in Row Crops

Generally, a nutrient deficiency occurs as a result of low soil nutrient levels. However, prevailing environmental conditions, soil properties, and growth conditions may restrict nutrient uptake and induce deficiencies in crops even if soil nutrient levels are deemed sufficient for optimum yield. For example, low or high soil pH, soil compaction, and excessively wet or dry soil may prevent nutrient uptake. A handy diagnostic tool to identify nutrient deficiency in crops is via visual symptoms. In some instances, this tool may not provide a definite diagnosis of the nutrient status of the plant. Keep in mind that there are other conditions that are cable of inducing symptoms that closely resemble those of nutrient deficiencies. Visual symptoms should be corroborated with tissue and/or soil testing. Adequate knowledge of visual symptoms and tissue testing may help guide corrective actions in-season or preventive action in the following season to avoid yield loss.

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Basics of the CFAP Direct Payments for Corn, Soybean, and Cotton

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Posted for Dr. Aaron Smith, Associate Professor and Extension Economist, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

The USDA has started accepting applications for CFAP payments to producers that have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Continue reading


Destroying a Poor Stand of Corn and Replanting Back to Corn

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Judging from recent conversations there will be a significant number of corn acres that will need to be replanted.  The long cold and wet spell apparently has greatly hindered getting a good stand in some corn fields. Fortunately, there are several options to control a thin corn stand and replant back to corn.

The options, like Select Max, need a waiting period before it can be planted back to corn.  Others, like tankmixes of paraquat plus atrazine, allow corn to be replanted right away.  Please find attached the results of a study Angela McClure and I conducted on destroying freeze damaged corn and replanting back to corn. We repeated the study the following year on a good stand of corn and got similar results. In this publication (Replanting corn in a failed corn stand) you will find a number of different herbicide options that did a good job controlling an unwanted stand of corn.

Many over the past decade have used the recommendations to satisfactory results.  The most consistent time to control an old corn stand is around the V2 corn growth stage, which was the timing the research was conducted.  Our experience has been over the years that once the old corn stand matures past V2, results from the herbicides in the publication will likely be more sketchy.  In those cases, consider using higher rates of the herbicides in the publication to improve the chance for good control.