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Tennessee Weekly Crop & Weather Report

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

WARMER TEMPERATURES WELCOMED BY FARMERS

Producers in Tennessee were finally able to get in their fields with 4.9 days suitable for field work. Tennessee had above normal temperatures and drier conditions than in previous weeks. This allowed for farmers to get in the fields to continue planting corn, soybeans and cotton, early cutting of hay, and other fieldwork activities. Topsoil moisture was 3 percent short, 68 percent adequate, and 29 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture was 2 percent short, 70 percent adequate, and 28 percent surplus. Continue reading at TN_05_07_18.  The U.S. Crop Progress report can be read at CropProg-05-07-2018.

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UT Commodity Market Update – 5/4/2018

Author: Danny Morris, Ext Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on UT Commodity Market Update – 5/4/2018

Corn: Since the beginning of the year, the September futures contract has increased by $0.40. An interesting fact is that of this increase, $0.21 has occurred over the last two weeks. The below chart reflects the recent run-up in corn futures:

 

Looking at the above the chart, obviously, something is driving the market. This begs the question as to what is causing the uptick in prices. Most of the nation’s corn crop is planted in April and by mid-May. Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on Tennessee Market Highlights

Corn, cotton, and wheat were up; soybeans were down for the week.

Since the USDA released the Prospective Plantings report on March 29th, commodity  prices and the price relationships between commodities have changed dramatically. For reference, the March 29th report estimated: corn acres planted at 88.026 million; soybean acres planted at 88.982 million; cotton acres planted at 13.469 million; and wheat acres planted at 47.339 million (spring wheat – 14.631 million acres). Since the report release, the harvest futures contract for each commodity (corn – December; soybeans – November; cotton – December; and wheat – July) has changed as follows: corn up 9 ½ cents ($4.11 ½ to $4.21); soybeans down 10 ½ cents ($10.47 ¾ to $10.37 ¼); cotton up 2.84 cents (77.73 to 80.57 cents); and wheat up 57 ¾ cents ($4.68 ½ to $5.26 ¼). Without considering other factors, such as planting weather and input costs, this change in relative prices would indicate potential increases for wheat (Northern Plains) and cotton Southern Plains and Southeast) at the expense of soybeans (or other crops, such as sorghum). Additionally, increased prices could pull more acreage into production, the Prospective Plantings report had principle crop acres planted decreasing 1.158 million acres (319.147 to 317.989 million acres), compared to 2017. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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Wheat Disease Update

Author: Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist Comments Off on Wheat Disease Update

Wheat is blooming and considerations about fungicide applications are being made. Continue reading

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Scout Corn for Cutworms

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Scout Corn for Cutworms
Black cutworm and cut plant

Much of our corn took a long while to emerge, and there has been opportunity for cutworms to infest fields since planting. Hence, make sure to scout for cutworm injury while checking stands. UT recommends treating for cutworms in corn when 5% or more of plants are injured or when you find 2 or more larvae per 100 plants. Synthetic pyrethroids are generally used to control infestations. Recommended insecticides and rates are listed here.

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Planning Ahead for Thrips Control in Cotton

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Planning Ahead for Thrips Control in Cotton

I’m re-running this post as we start planting cotton in Tennessee. If you believe the thrips forecast models developed by NCSU, and my experience is that it works well, then thrips populations are behind schedule.  Thus, if we can get some cotton planted in the next 7-14 days, there is a good chance the cotton can outrun thrips before populations peak. Of course, weather is still a significant factor in how badly thrips impact seedlings.

Thrips Infestation Predictor for Cottonhttp://climate.ncsu.edu/CottonTIP

Our options for thrips control in Tennessee are mostly unchanged, but there are some key points Continue reading

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Applicators Must Have a Copy of 24c Label for Engenia or XtendiMax

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off on Applicators Must Have a Copy of 24c Label for Engenia or XtendiMax

It is my understanding that applicators when they apply Engenia or XtendiMax must have on hand a copy of the 24c label for those herbicides.  A hard copy is preferred. Baring that a downloaded copy on to your Ipad, tablet or phone would be better than nothing.  Trying to down load a copy on to your phone as the TDA inspector pulls into your field is not recommended. The links so you can down load, print a copy and read before you go spray is:

Engenia  http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ldDG8026.pdf

XtendiMaxTN xtendimax 24c label Continue reading

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