Recent Updates

Consider Wheat Herbicide Plant Back Intervals on Failed Wheat Stand Decisions

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist 2 Comments

It will be the end of next week (March 24) before we can tell how badly the wheat was injured from the cold temperatures this week.  Of course, a decade ago we had a similar cold spell that many folks refer to as the Easter freeze.  Back then some fields were destroyed and replanted to other crops while others were kept and went to yield.  Then as now when making this decision the herbicides that have been applied to the wheat must play a factor in how to proceed. Continue reading

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Freeze damage to jointing wheat

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist 2 Comments

For much of Tennessee’s wheat, the cold front which moved through Saturday (March 11th) dropped temperatures near the danger zone. Jointing typically does not occur until late March but our mild winter has allowed much of the timely planted wheat to mature faster than normal.  Much of our wheat is between Feekes stages 7 and 8.  In the below image, the growing point was located near the knife blade.  Wheat becomes considerably less tolerant to cold temperatures after the growing point leaves the base of the plant. Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on Tennessee Market Highlights

Corn, soybeans, and wheat were down; cotton was mixed for the week.

Thursday’s WASDE report projected a record large soybean crop for Brazil and increased production estimates for South American corn production. Minor adjustments were made to the U.S. domestic balance sheet. The decrease in soybean exports was unexpected at this juncture, however record South American production and a strengthening USD, relative the Brazilian Real, provide some justification for USDA changes.

For corn, compared to last month’s report, domestic supply was unchanged; feed and residual was decreased 50 million bushels and ethanol was increased 50 million (resulting in no changed in domestic use); U.S. ending stocks were unchanged; and foreign stocks were increased 123 million bushels. Currently, global ending stocks are projected at 8.688 billion bushels (2.32 billion in the U.S. and 6.368 billion in foreign stocks), up 4.6% from the previous marketing year. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates

This link to  the March 9, 2017 – USDA World Supply and Demand Estimates contains a summary of the USDA’s monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Domestic balance sheets for corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat are displayed along with price reaction in futures markets for each commodity on the day of the report release. Additionally, supply and demand estimates for key importing and exporting countries are provided for the current month along with change in estimates from the previous report. The Profitability Outlook section contains estimated returns per acre for each commodity for 2017 based on Tennessee state average yield projections and estimated price offerings for 2017(note: cotton prices include a seed and hauling rebate). Variable expenses are based on the University of Tennessee Extension 2017 Row Crop Budgets. Prices are updated monthly; expenses are updated as warranted during the year and may be different than the expenses contained in the 2017 Row Crop Budgets. This section provides an estimation of the current relative profitability amongst major row crops in Tennessee.

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Picking Capacities in the MidSouth

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on Picking Capacities in the MidSouth


There is considerable excitement surrounding cotton on the heels of the Farm and Gin Show.  From visiting with those in the industry across the Mid-South, I believe TN and nearby states may see larger increases than those initially estimated by the National Cotton Council for the 2017 season.  Given the increases in acreage, picker capacity has been a topic of conversation over the past few weeks.  Many sold basket equipment several years ago with plans to purchase a module building picker if cotton made its way back on the farm.  Now that cotton is coming back, how much cotton can you typically feed through one picker in Tennessee? Mississippi?  Missouri? What about capacities in states outside the Mid-South?  Continue reading

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on Tennessee Market Highlights

Corn, soybeans, and cotton were up; wheat was mixed for the week. This week started out with a bang as rumors regarding changes to RFS/Ethanol/ Biodiesel provided fuel for Tuesday’s rally in corn and soybean markets. For the remainder of the week markets moved sideways to lower. The final projected prices and price volatility factors for crop insurance for corn, soybeans, and cotton in Tennessee were set this week. For corn, projected price was set at $3.96 with a price volatility factor of 0.19 (compared to last year – $3.86 and 0.17). For soybeans, projected price was set at $10.19 with a price volatility factor of 0.16 (compared to last year – $8.85 and 0.12). For cotton, projected price was set at $0.74 with a price volatility factor of 0.15 (compared to last year – $0.60 and 0.14). Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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UT Commodity Market Update 3/3/2017

Author: Danny Morris, Ext Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off on UT Commodity Market Update 3/3/2017

Corn: Over the past month, corn futures have been trading in a relatively sideways pattern. However, the past few days have allowed cash bids for new crop corn to be near $4.00 levels. Based on the UT Extension Crop Budgets, a producer could potentially lock in a profit at this price level, assuming an average yield of 150 bushels per acre. Private estimates are currently projecting corn acres to be lower in 2017 compared to last year’s levels. Continue reading

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