Category Archives: Soybean

Heat stress on its way

Author: Avat Shekoofa, Crop Physiologist Comments Off on Heat stress on its way

The three-month outlook for July, August, and September currently depicts enhanced odds of warmer than normal temperatures. Meanwhile, the precipitation outlook for the same three-month time period places the region in an area of equal chances of above, near, or below normal precipitation totals (see the map). Continue reading

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Moth traps and southwestern corn borers

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Moth traps and southwestern corn borers

As always, moth trapping data for the season can be found on the quick links menu (http://www.utcrops.com/BlogStuff/2017MothTrappingData.pdf). We are now catching a few more corn earworm (bollworm) moths, but nothing too startling. However, it is clear that the second generation moth flight for southwestern corn borer is underway, and we will catch even more moths next week. Keep in mind that there is a lot of variation among locations. It can be a waste of money to treat for southwestern corn borers based on trap catches that are not near your fields. You should be running a few Continue reading

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Kudzu Bug Migration into Soybean

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Kudzu Bug Migration into Soybean

I’ve been watching kudzu bug populations on kudzu, and I am now seeing late-instar immature stages and next-generation adults. This means we will start seeing adults migrating into some soybean fields. With the mild winter and early spring, this migration will be sooner than we’ve seen in the past. We might have expected it to be larger also, but populations on kudzu do not seem especially high. A fungus (Beauveria bassiana) has helped considerably at reducing populations of kudzu bug , and I’m hoping we again see the benefits this year. You will notice a fuzzy white fungus growing on dead nymphs and adults when they are filled by Beauveria. Continue reading

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2017 Soybean Scout Schools in July (Final Details)

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on 2017 Soybean Scout Schools in July (Final Details)
Looper (2 pair of prolegs)

The 2017 Soybean Scout Schools have been scheduled for three locations. Scout schools are sponsored by the Tennessee Promotion Board. They typically last 2-2.5 hours and provide hands-on training on the basics of soybean growth and the scouting and management of weeds, insects, and diseases. Participants will receive a scouting notebook and complimentary sweep net while supplies last. Pesticide recertification points and CCA CEU points are offered. See below for details, and updates and reminders will be posted in future articles. Continue reading

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Fall Armyworms Look to Make and Early Start (again)

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Fall Armyworms Look to Make and Early Start (again)

It seems that fall armyworms have gotten a running start in recent years. This species does not overwinter in Tennessee, but it may survive warm winters in the extreme southern areas of coastal states during mild winters. It migrates into Tennessee each year. Often, fall armyworms don’t show in substantial numbers until late July or August. However, they are being found Continue reading

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Irrigation for Corn and Soybeans

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Irrigation for Corn and Soybeans

Warm weather and high heat indexes mean farmers are irrigating fields that have missed rain recently. It is important to consider crop stage and utilize available soil sensor data to make the best decision on when and how much water to apply.  Continue reading

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Threecornered Alfalfa Hoppers in Soybean

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Threecornered Alfalfa Hoppers in Soybean

Although not a major pest, the threecornered alfalfa hopper (TCAH) causes occasional damage by girdling the main stems of seedling plants (typically those < 10 inches tall). They will feed around the perimeter of the stem with their beak, eventually creating a swollen callus. By itself, this injury does not affect yield, but Continue reading

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