Category Archives: Soybean

Insect Calls of the Week (August 1, 2019)

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I don’t think I have had a call about soybean all week, but my observations suggest we need to be scouting for stink bugs in our earliest beans, and in some areas, kudzu bugs. Thus far, caterpillar infestations have been very light. As the bollworm flight increases, closely scout for corn earworm in Continue reading

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Field Days – Water Management and Sensor Demonstration for Soybean (Next Week)

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A field tours of water management and sensor demonstrations in soybean are planned for nest week (see below).  Please navigate to the following page for more details about times, locations and registration information – https://ag.tennessee.edu/BESS/Pages/Sensor-Comparison.aspx.

  • July 30 – West TN Research and Education Center (field tour and in-service training)
  • August 1 – Weakley Co. (sensor demonstration)
  • August 2 – Fayette/Hardeman Co. (sensor demonstration)

 

 

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Reminder – Soybean Scout School This Week (7/17) in Dyersburg

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UT’s Soybean Scout Schools will be held in July (see below). These field-side programs cover the basics of soybean growth, scouting, pest identification, and general management. Pesticide recertification and CCA CEU points will be available. Scout Schools are offered free of charge with sponsorship from the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board. Registration is not required. Participants will receive a scouting notebook and a sweep net while supplies last. Continue reading

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Control Options for Prickly Sida that has Escaped Engenia or XtendiMax and Glyphosate

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Prickly Sida and Palmer amaranth escaping 22 oz of XtendiMax and 32 oz Roundup PM picture taken 28 DAA

There have been a good number of calls reporting poor prickly sida (teaweed) control with Engenia or XtendiMax tankmixed with Roundup PM.  I have seen prickly sida escape dicamba tankmixed with glyphosate in some research here at the station as well.   This appears to have been a building problem as I recall similar, though fewer, calls last year.  The lack of prickly sida control in the Xtend system has been building a seed bank that is apparently showing up in many fields this year. Continue reading

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New Tactics Needed in Managing Weeds in Xtend Crops

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Palmer amaranth recovering 20 days after 12.8 oz Engenia and 32 oz Roundup PM

After more questions this past week on follow-up applications to remove Palmer amaranth, junglerice and goosegrass in Xtend crops it occurred to me we need a new thought process on weed management  with this technology. Roundup Ready soybeans came out in 1996 and cotton in 1998.  If we look back at the first three years with that technology, glyphosate was controlling every weed no matter the weed height. That Roundup Ready performance in the early years is still the expectation with Xtend technology. It has become abundantly clear, in year three, that Engenia or XtendiMax mixed with glyphosate is not providing even close to the level of weed control that glyphosate alone did back in it’s hay day.  Continue reading

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Insect Calls of the Week (July 3, 2019)

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Clouded plant bug adult

Plant bugs … I’d classify the overall plant bug pressure in cotton as average, although we are seeing a few more clouded plant bugs than in recent years. Until bolls are present, count tarnished and clouded plant bugs the same. Once bolls are present, I suggest counting clouded plant bugs as equivalent to 1.5 tarnished plant bugs when making a treatment decision, primarily because clouded plant bugs are more inclined to feed on bolls.  As cotton begins blooming, Continue reading

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