Category Archives: Sorghum

Upcoming Crop Production Meetings

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Upcoming Crop Production Meetings

Meeting season is in full swing, and there are several educational opportunities fast approaching (see below). Pesticide re-certification points and CCA points will be available at all these meeting. Additional details will be provided soon! Continue reading

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Weed and Insect Control Recommendations Now Available

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Weed and Insect Control Recommendations Now Available

The 2016 Weed Control Manual for Tennessee (PB1580) and the 2016 Insect Control Recommendations for Field Crops (PB1768) are now available online.  As always, hard copies will be made available at various county and state production meetings and at Extension county offices.  But they are always a couple of clicks away at UTcrops.com.

Insect Control Guide
Insect Control Guide
Weed Control Manual
Weed Control Manual
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New Sorghum Insect Scouting Video

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on New Sorghum Insect Scouting Video

A new, 12-minute video on the scouting of common insect pests in sorghum is now available at UTcrops.com, or you can directly link to the video below.  Thanks to UT’s own Ginger Rowsey for her hard work putting this together.

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Planting Wheat after Grain Sorghum

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Planting Wheat after Grain Sorghum

Planting wheat after sorghum can be done successfully.  Wheat stands are most uniform when the sorghum crop is killed with glyphosate and at least a month or more has passed between sorghum harvest and wheat planting. Continue reading

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Soybean and Sorghum

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Soybean and Sorghum

Soybean

Although stink bug populations remain generally light, there are now some reports of populations exceeding the treatment threshold of 9 per 25 sweeps. Remember you should probably double this threshold once a field reaches R6. Calls are also trickling in about defoliation Continue reading

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Sugarcane aphids and harvest aids

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Sugarcane aphids and harvest aids

The questions of the week have been … when/if should I put an insecticide out with my harvest aid for sugarcane aphids in sorghum, or if you are still a week or more from making a harvest aid application, should you hold off with the insecticide until making this application. First, I’ll refer you to a good article from Mississippi State University from last week. This article also addresses if, when, and what harvest aids can be applied. Continue reading

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Update on Sugarcane Aphids in Sorghum

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Update on Sugarcane Aphids in Sorghum

Although a common comment this week has been that sugarcane aphid (SCA) infestations are not spreading rapidly, with most infestations concentrated on field edges, we are steadily treating more and more sorghum fields. You can assume SCA are present in essentially all fields in West Tennessee, but fields requiring treatment are scattered across the area (see below). It hasn’t always been true, but a common theme is that many of the fields treated within the last few weeks with a pyrethroid insecticide are those that have required treatment for aphids. Continue reading

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Grain Sorghum- Harvest and Harvest Aids

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Grain Sorghum- Harvest and Harvest Aids

Early planted sorghum is maturing and producers will need to decide soon if they want to spray a harvest product to aid in combining.  A harvest aid kills the grain sorghum plant (glyphosate) or dries up leaves (sodium chlorate) and allows easier cutting where stands are thick, removes food source from heavy sugarcane aphid infestations, or is a way to clean up grasses or vines. Aim herbicide is labeled to desiccate vines in sorghum but is not an effective crop desiccant. Continue reading

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