Category Archives: Fertility

Wrapping up harvest aid applications in 2016

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on Wrapping up harvest aid applications in 2016

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We have been blessed with another great harvest season and it appears we may be able to finish harvest with little rain.  Here on the 5th day of Oct, I would guess the average cotton acre within the state has already received the first application of harvest aids and is very close to seeing a picker.  Even so, several acres have not been defoliated.  This has led many to call with concerns about the cooler temperatures in the forecast over the weekend and several have asked if it is simply time to defoliate based on calendar date.   Continue reading

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2016 Mid-South Cotton Defoliation Guide

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on 2016 Mid-South Cotton Defoliation Guide

defolguideTennessee’s 2016 cotton crop is rapidly maturing and many of our acres will receive the first shot of defoliant in the next week.  There are many factors to consider in determining timing, products and rates.   In an effort to outline these decisions and provide harvest aid recommendations for the Mid-South, the 2016 Mid-South Cotton Defoliation Guide has just been updated and is now available online.   To access the guide, click the image above or the included link.  Please keep in mind that this was compiled as a regional guide and should be used in conjunction with your previous experiences. Continue reading

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Cotton turning . . . too soon?

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on Cotton turning . . . too soon?

IMG_4307The call of the week (beyond target spot) has concerned cotton ‘turning’.  In the dictionary of cotton rhetoric, ‘turning’ refers to the shift in canopy color from dark green to shades of yellow and red, or senescence, which usually coincides with the second or third week of football season.  Over the past week, the crop has definitely made a turn towards finishing out the season .  . .  and kickoff for the first game is still a few days away. The general concern is this change has occurred much more rapidly and earlier than we would like.  So are we looking at premature senescence and yield penalties? Continue reading

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Red leaves in cotton: Causes and implications

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on Red leaves in cotton: Causes and implications

Tyson Raper, Heather Kelly and Frank Yin
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IMG_1778Observing canopy characteristics during the growing season is a good way to understand the plant’s response to its environment.  Occasionally, portions of the canopy may develop reddish-purple or red tones.  The synthesis of anthocyanin, the pigment which typically causes the reddening, is commonly increased after leaves are exposed to light following multiple abiotic and biotic stresses.  Continue reading

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Pesticide Points and CEUs at Milan No-Till Field Day

Author: Ginger Rowsey, Marketing and Communications Comments Off on Pesticide Points and CEUs at Milan No-Till Field Day

 

2016No Till Logo Finalhigh resCommercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Points can be obtained in C1, C10 and C12. Seven points will be available in each category. A total of 13 Certified Crop Advisor Continuing Education Units will also be available. See the complete breakdown here.

 

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Updated sulfur recommendations for cotton

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist 2 Comments

Tyson Raper and Frank Yin

ARTICLE OVERVIEW 

  • Sulfur deficiencies are starting to show up this year in TN cotton.
  • Deficiencies appear as uniform chlorosis of new growth, slight stunting
  • Soil applied applications of ammonium sulfate can still remedy the deficiency 
  • Late season deficiencies can be addressed with (2) applications of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt)
  • UT currently recommends 10 lb S per ac for cotton
Ames Plantation, TN S plots
LEFT: New growth of sulfur deficient cotton will appear uniformly chlorotic (yellow) and may be stunted. This row received no S at planting. RIGHT: Applications of 10-20 lb S per acre have been shown to prevent the deficiency. This plot received 20 lb S at planting.

Sulfur (S) deficiencies are beginning to appear in some West TN cotton fields.  The image above was taken last week at Ames Plantation in a trial conducted by Dr. Frank Yin.  Although the soils at that location (Collins fine sandy loam) are coarser than our typical silt loam, I was surprised to see such a strong response to the nutrient by Continue reading

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