Category Archives: Diseases

Cotton turning . . . too soon?

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist No Comments

IMG_4307The call of the week (beyond target spot) has concerned cotton ‘turning’.  In the dictionary of cotton rhetoric, ‘turning’ refers to the shift in canopy color from dark green to shades of yellow and red, or senescence, which usually coincides with the second or third week of football season.  Over the past week, the crop has definitely made a turn towards finishing out the season .  . .  and kickoff for the first game is still a few days away. The general concern is this change has occurred much more rapidly and earlier than we would like.  So are we looking at premature senescence and yield penalties? Continue reading

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Target spot in cotton – the knowns and unknowns

Author: Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist Comments Off on Target spot in cotton – the knowns and unknowns

Since the first report of target spot in cotton in Tennessee in 2013 it has been found in more fields and earlier in the season. This year in particular some have sprayed a fungicide to protect their cotton in Tennessee. Continue reading

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Soybean Disease Update

Author: Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist Comments Off on Soybean Disease Update

Many soybean fields are in reproductive growth stages and need to be scouted for disease to decide if a fungicide is needed. Some diseases that have been observed in fields in Tennessee include frogeye leaf spot, septoria brown spot, and downy mildew. Continue reading

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Red leaves in cotton: Causes and implications

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off on Red leaves in cotton: Causes and implications

Tyson Raper, Heather Kelly and Frank Yin
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IMG_1778Observing canopy characteristics during the growing season is a good way to understand the plant’s response to its environment.  Occasionally, portions of the canopy may develop reddish-purple or red tones.  The synthesis of anthocyanin, the pigment which typically causes the reddening, is commonly increased after leaves are exposed to light following multiple abiotic and biotic stresses.  Continue reading

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Pesticide Points and CEUs at Milan No-Till Field Day

Author: Ginger Rowsey, Marketing and Communications Comments Off on Pesticide Points and CEUs at Milan No-Till Field Day

 

2016No Till Logo Finalhigh resCommercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Points can be obtained in C1, C10 and C12. Seven points will be available in each category. A total of 13 Certified Crop Advisor Continuing Education Units will also be available. See the complete breakdown here.

 

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