Category Archives: Diseases

Reminder: UT Cotton Scout School, May 29th

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

The annual UT Cotton Scout School will be held on Friday, May 29th at the West Tennessee Research and Education Center (605 Airways Blvd, Jackson). Registration will begin at 8:00 AM with the official program starting at 8:30. It will end with a lunch, but those interested can attend a short  ‘go to the field’ session after lunch. We hope to increase the hands-on portion of the program this year. Topics will include crop development, insect and weed identification, scouting techniques, and more. No registration fee or preregistration is required.

 

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2015 TN Cotton Quick Facts

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off

w319With snow in the forecast, I hope you find some warmth in our hot-off-the-press 2015 Tennessee Cotton Quick Facts Publication (W 319) which is now available online.  New this year are digital hyperlinks to all full-length UTIA publications.  Simply click on the grey boxes or related QR codes describing the publication in which you are interested and your browser will do the rest. Keep losing your guide or tired of carrying paper guides around? Open this document with the reader on your mobile device (if Apple, your iBooks app) to have a digital copy at your fingertips at all times.  Hyperlinks will still work!

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Wheat N considerations for early 2015

Author: Tyson Raper, Cotton & Small Grains Specialist Comments Off

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I’ve recently received several calls concerning N applications on wheat. Although this cold front has made it easier to get across wet fields, it is still early for the first split in a late winter/early spring split-N application approach. To make the most of the first split, target ‘spring greenup’, or the period in which wheat breaks dormancy and begins to grow rapidly (typically Feekes 3 or Zadoks 25). Delaying applications until this point can help ensure the applied N is available to the developing crop by reducing the potential for N loss. The current N demand of the dormant crop Continue reading

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