Category Archives: Cotton

Scout Cotton and Soybean Fields Planted Last Week for Palmer Amaranth

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

I have gotten numerous reports of Palmer amaranth becoming established in fields where PRE applied herbicides were not activated by timely rainfall. Indeed I have seen some in my research as well. There were many acres of cotton and soybean planted May 7 to May 14. The rain that was in the forecast for last week was a no-show.  The result is many of the PRE applied herbicides sprayed on all those cotton and soybean acres was not activated.  This has led to a large flush of Palmer amaranth to emerge with the cotton and soybean in a good number of fields in Tennessee. Continue reading

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Enlist Stewardship Critical in 2018

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist No Comments

There was about 20,000 acres of Enlist cotton planted in Tennessee in 2017.  Visiting with Extension agents, retailers and farmers this spring it is clear that there will be many fold more acres of Enlist cotton planted in 2018 compared to 2017.  Continue reading

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Reminder – UT Cotton Scout School (Thursday, May 24th) at Milan

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

The University of Tennessee Cotton Scout School will be held Thursday, May 24th, at the Agricultural Museum at the Research and Education Center in Milan (3A Ledbetter Gate Road, Milan, TN 38358). There is no fee, and preregistration is not required. Registration begins at 8:00 AM with the program starting at 8:45. Content will include hands-on training with an optional ‘go-to-the-field session’ after a box lunch. Topics covered will include cotton development, identification of insects (and their damage) weed and diseases and their damage, and weed identification.

Please note that this is a new location because of ongoing renovation at the Jackson Office.

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Tennessee Market Highlights

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat were down for the week.

The big news for markets this week was the release of the USDA’s May World
Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. The May Report
provided the first WASDE estimates for the new crop (2018/19 marketing
year). The planted acreage data was from the Prospective Plantings report
and the yield data was a weather adjusted trend yield, so it is likely that many changes will occur over the growing season as more information is revealed. However, the report does set a “baseline” for production, use, and stocks for the each crop. Continue reading at Tennessee Market Highlights.

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Supply and Demand Estimates and Profitability Outlook

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments
The Supply & Demand Estimates and Profitability Outlook is a summary of the USDA’s monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Domestic balance sheets for corn, soybeans, cotton, and wheat are displayed along with price reaction in futures markets for each commodity on the day of the report release. Additionally, supply and demand estimates for key importing and exporting countries are provided for the current month along with change in estimates from the previous report. The Profitability Outlook section contains estimated returns per acre for each commodity based  on 2017 Tennessee state average/trend yields and current price offerings (note: cotton prices include a seed and hauling rebate). Variable expenses are based on the University of Tennessee Extension 2018 Row Crop Budgets. Prices are updated monthly; expenses are updated as warranted during the year and may be different than the expenses contained in the 2018 Row Crop Budgets. This section provides an estimation of the current relative profitability among major row crops in Tennessee.
The report is prepared monthly by Dr. Aaron Smith and Chuck Danehower.
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Tennessee Cotton County Estimates – 2017

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

Tennessee cotton producers in 2017 harvested  732,000 bales of cotton on 340,000 acres for an average yield of 1033 pounds per acre. Haywood County led the state with 59,600 acres harvested producing 123,300 bales of cotton. For a breakdown by county for 2017 cotton production, continue reading at Cotton17_TN.

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Tennessee 2018 Wheat Production Expected to Increase

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

USDA, NASS, Tennessee Field Office                                                        In Cooperation with:
Debra Kenerson, State Statistician PO Box 41505
Nashville, Tennessee 37204-1505                                          Tennessee Department of Agriculture
(615) 781-5300 or 1-800-626-0987                                                   Jai Templeton, Commissioner
Email: nass-tn@nass.usda.gov

Released: May 10, 2018

Tennessee 2018 Wheat Production Expected to Increase

Tennessee farmers expect to harvest 21.6 million bushels of winter wheat during 2018 according to the Tennessee Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. The expected crop for 2018 would be up 12 percent from the previous year. Farmers seeded 400,000 acres last fall with 300,000 acres to be harvested for grain. Based on crop conditions as of May 1 and assuming a normal growing season, farmers expect a yield of 72.0 bushels per acre, up 2.0 bushels from 2017. Acres for other uses totaled 100,000 acres and will be used as cover crop or cut as silage or hay.  Continue reading

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Corn Insect Update (Aphids, etc.)

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Corn Insect Update (Aphids, etc.)

There is nothing of great concern going on, but I wanted to mention one thing I am getting some calls about. Corn leaf aphids are being found on seedling corn, more than likely moving from weedy grasses that were in the field. This is nothing to get too excited about. It is unlikely these infestations will hurt yield. It does suggest that insecticide seed treatments are no longer working. This is not surprising in many cases because it took two or more weeks for much of out early planted corn to emerge. This does make a point that Continue reading

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