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Category Archives: Corn

21
Jul
2014
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

As reported by NASS on July 21, 2014

RAINS HINDRENCE FOR SOME, WELCOMED BY OTHERS

With no end in sight for some producers, rains have drowned out some crop acreages and prevented planting of others. The wet weather is, however, helping soybean and corn development but heat units are still needed for the cotton crop because of its sensitivity to adverse environmental conditions. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 20 14 .

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19
Jul
2014
Proper Nozzle Selection for Pesticide Applications
Author: Shawn Butler, Graduate Research Assistant No Comments

As we get further into the year, bugs begin to enter our fields, disease onset starts to occur, and weeds continue to flourish, our chances of making tank-mixed applications increase. This ultimately makes spray nozzle selection more challenging as most products require different droplet sizes.  Continue reading

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15
Jul
2014
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management No Comments

As reported by NASS on July 14, 2014

WEATHER HAMPERS WHEAT HARVEST; COTTON NEEDS HEAT UNITS

Weather continues to take a toll on Tennessee crops. Some fields have been planted multiple times because of standing water and, in some areas, wheat is still standing due to wet fields. Rains have cooled temperatures, which has a negative effect on the cotton crop through a decrease of needed heat units. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 13 14 .

 

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14
Jul
2014
Reminder: Milan No-till Field Day This Thursday
Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

Without a doubt, the Milan No-Till Crop Production Field Day is one of the most far-ranging agricultural field days in the nation. The event is a junction for producers with varied farming interests. Tours will cover topics as diverse as row crop sustainability, beef cattle production, natural resource management, unmanned aerial systems and even the compatibility of honeybees and agriculture. Registration is free and begins at 6 a.m. CDT, with the first tours leaving at 7 a.m. A total of 16 tours are on the agenda. Continue reading

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13
Jul
2014
Corn and Soybean Field Day at Milan
Author: Heather Young Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist No Comments

University of Tennessee’s field crop specialists are putting on a corn and soybean field day at the Research and Education Center in Milan on Tuesday, August 19th. Registration opens at 9 and tour will be begin at 9:30 a.m and will conclude with lunch. Information on soybean and corn disease, insect, and weed management, as well as agronomic information will be presented. Pesticide re-certification and CCA CEUs will be available.

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08
Jul
2014
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on July 7, 2014

HEAVY RAIN SHOWERS IN SOME AREAS, GENERAL RAIN NEEDED IN OTHERS

Persistent rains over the past two weeks are now showing advantages through steady development of crops, though the cotton crop would benefit from more heat units. Steady rains kept some producers out of the field for a time, but diminished enough for wheat harvest to be completed in a few areas. Continue reading at Crop Progress 7 6 14 .

 

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03
Jul
2014
Moths are on Vacation
Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off

Our trap lines are indicating low moth activity for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, and southwestern corn borer (link to Excel file). In moth traps this last week, we only caught an average of 7 corn earworms (a.k.a., bollworms) and less than 1 tobacco budworm and southwestern corn borer per trap. Continue reading

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30
Jun
2014
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on June 30, 2014

CROP HARVEST AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRESS WELL

The warm, dry weather allowed producers to make excellent progress with wheat harvest, which is still reported to show average to above average yields. The warm weather benefitted the cotton crop, which is squaring a rate above last year and the 5-year average. Persistent rains over the past two weeks are now showing advantages through corn starting to tassel ahead of normal. Continue reading at Crop Progress 6 29 14

 

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26
Jun
2014
Considerations for Fungicide Application in Tasseling Corn
Author: Heather Young Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist Comments Off

With corn tasseling in Tennessee, it is time to consider a fungicide application. Continue reading

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26
Jun
2014
Spraying Corn with Insecticide
Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off

As much of our corn begins to tassel, some questions have predictably been asked about putting insecticide out with foliar fungicide applications. This is NOT a generally recommended practice. Myself and my counterparts have tested this thoroughly in the Mid South, and these data indicate a negative return on investment in most cases. Below are some points (and exceptions) for your consideration. Continue reading

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24
Jun
2014
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on June 23, 2014

LONG SUFFERING PRODUCERS GET BREAK IN WEATHER

Producers took full advantage of the break in wet weather and made great progress with wheat harvest and soybean planting. Wheat harvest now falls more in line with both last year and the 5-year average, and still indicates strong yields. Continue reading at Crop Progress 6 22 14 .

 

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19
Jun
2014
Confusing marestail with burnweed?
Author: Garret Montgomery 2 Comments
IMG_0400

(Left: burnweed) (Right: marestail)

With calls coming in about weed identification, one weed has been particularly popular this year. Burnweed is an erect summer annual plant that can be found throughout the Midwestern and Eastern parts of the United States. Many folks mistake burnweed for horseweed and indeed from the road it does look like horseweed. Continue reading

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