Category Archives: Corn

Heat stress on its way

Author: Avat Shekoofa, Crop Physiologist No Comments

The three-month outlook for July, August, and September currently depicts enhanced odds of warmer than normal temperatures. Meanwhile, the precipitation outlook for the same three-month time period places the region in an area of equal chances of above, near, or below normal precipitation totals (see the map). Continue reading

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Moth traps and southwestern corn borers

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Moth traps and southwestern corn borers

As always, moth trapping data for the season can be found on the quick links menu (http://www.utcrops.com/BlogStuff/2017MothTrappingData.pdf). We are now catching a few more corn earworm (bollworm) moths, but nothing too startling. However, it is clear that the second generation moth flight for southwestern corn borer is underway, and we will catch even more moths next week. Keep in mind that there is a lot of variation among locations. It can be a waste of money to treat for southwestern corn borers based on trap catches that are not near your fields. You should be running a few Continue reading

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Corn Southern Rust Confirmed in west Tennessee

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Corn Southern Rust Confirmed in west Tennessee

With the continued wet and warm weather, it didn’t take long to identify Southern rust in some Madison county corn, and additional fields are being scouted this week.  Continue reading

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Corn Southern rust still not confirmed in Tennessee

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Corn Southern rust still not confirmed in Tennessee

I wanted send out a brief update on corn disease progress as of the end of June.  We are scouting fields regularly now and with storms blowing into the state from south and west, a number of corn leaves where Southern rust was suspected have been brought to the lab here in Jackson. Continue reading

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Foliar Diseases and Fungicide Applications in Corn

Author: Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist Comments Off on Foliar Diseases and Fungicide Applications in Corn

Trying to decide whether or not to spray fungicide on your corn? First, you should scout for diseases and consider your disease risk. Southern rust has been reported in TX, MS, AL, AR, GA, and FL and with the tropical storm there is a good chance spores have been blown in to TN and the wet, overcast weather provides the perfect environment for disease development. Continue reading

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Fall Armyworms Look to Make and Early Start (again)

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Fall Armyworms Look to Make and Early Start (again)

It seems that fall armyworms have gotten a running start in recent years. This species does not overwinter in Tennessee, but it may survive warm winters in the extreme southern areas of coastal states during mild winters. It migrates into Tennessee each year. Often, fall armyworms don’t show in substantial numbers until late July or August. However, they are being found Continue reading

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Irrigation for Corn and Soybeans

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist Comments Off on Irrigation for Corn and Soybeans

Warm weather and high heat indexes mean farmers are irrigating fields that have missed rain recently. It is important to consider crop stage and utilize available soil sensor data to make the best decision on when and how much water to apply.  Continue reading

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Don’t freak out about Japanese beetles

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Don’t freak out about Japanese beetles

They’re back, but they don’t scare me! It is very unusual to see economic damage from Japanese beetles in cotton, soybean, or corn. They may cause defoliation in all crops. I’ve never seen enough defoliation in cotton or corn to justify treatment. On a few occasions, I’ve seen enough defoliation in soybean to catch my attention. They will hang around for a while, so in combination with other defoliators, they may cause enough damage Continue reading

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