Category Archives: Corn

Does Adding a Residual to Burndown Make Sense?

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off

When planning your burndown does a residual make sense?  That depends on if a follow-up burndown is planned at planting, the expected planting date and what is the intended crop. If the expected planting date is 3 weeks or so off and the plan is to burndown with something at planting then a residual in with the burndown now is probably not warranted. However, if the intended planting date is more than 30 days away, then a residual can provide the advantage of not having a big, grown up mess to have to plant into. Continue reading

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Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

Through rains and light snow during the week, some producers were able to finish harvesting their crops, while others may not finish until after Thanksgiving. Cooler temperatures have led to feeding cattle more hay. Some pastures are holding water or experiencing hard freezes, negatively affecting condition. Continue reading at Crop Progress 11 23 14 .

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Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on November 17, 2014

CORN HARVEST WINDS DOWN

Despite showers midweek in advance of a cold front, farmers managed to make good progress harvesting corn, cotton and soybeans. Drastically cooler temperatures affected the emergence of newly planted wheat and caused some livestock producers to start feeding hay. There were 4.9 days suitable for field work. Continue reading at Crop Progress 11 16 14 .

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Crop Progress

Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on November 10, 2014

 RAIN SLOWS CROP HARVEST, AIDS NEWLY SEEDED PASTURES

Between rains, producers made progress with planting and harvesting crops in the 4.1 days suitable for field work. Even though rains kept producers out of their fields, the rains were beneficial to pastures, which are in mostly good condition. Topsoil moisture was 6 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were 1 percent very short, 11 percent short, 81 percent adequate, and 7 percent surplus. Continue reading at Crop Progress 11 9 14 .

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