Category Archives: Corn

Cotton – Thinking Ahead About Bollworms

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist No Comments

It is uncertain how big our moth flight will be this year. As usual, bollworm moth catches have been generally low to this point. However, you can expect activity to slowly increase, with a peak in moth activity occurring the last week of July and the first week of August. With the decreasing efficacy of pyrethroid insecticides and increasing tolerance to some Bt toxins, you should plan on using Continue reading

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Moth Trapping Results and Other Reminders

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Moth Trapping Results and Other Reminders

A reminder that weekly moth tap catches for corn earworm (bollworm), tobacco budworm, and southwestern corn borer can be found under the quick links menu under Moth Trapping Data.

With the exception of southwestern corn borers (SWCB) in some locations , we’ve not been catching many moths. Now would be a good time to scout the whorls of any non-Bt corn for the presence of corn borers. Remember that the treatment threshold during the whorl stage is when 5% of plants are infested with SWCB.

Also remember that UT Pest Guides are available at http://guide.utcrops.com/. They provide the latest information of pest identification, sampling, and management in a mobile-friendly, app-like format.

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Corn and Soybean Irrigation Reminders

Author: Angela McClure, Extension Corn and Soybean Specialist 1 Comment

Although most of Tennessee was blessed with an overabundance of rain this spring, warmer than average temperatures have increased water use by the corn crop and fields should be monitored now if irrigation is an option. Continue reading

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Palmer Amaranth Management: Frequent Rain Making it very Difficult

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off on Palmer Amaranth Management: Frequent Rain Making it very Difficult

This weather pattern has Palmer amaranth management in a terrible fix for many fields in West Tennessee.  The rain that has occurred on an almost daily basis for over a week in many areas has delayed early POST herbicide applications.  The forecast for rain into June looks to be a similar pattern. There will likely be a very small window to spray until the first week of June for numerous fields.  Palmer amaranth is growing quickly and now is often in the 1 to 3” range where a PRE was used and 10 to 14” range in fields where no PRE was used.  Continue reading

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Managing Large Palmer Amaranth in Large Corn

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off on Managing Large Palmer Amaranth in Large Corn

Judging by our research here as well as field visits and  phone calls from folks walking corn fields it is very apparent that pretty much any PRE applied herbicide in corn has given out. Even some of the PRE applied herbicides that traditionally have provided consistently long weed control like Acuron or Bicep have given out about 25 days after application.  In a few fields I visited today clearly no PRE was applied to the corn and Palmer amaranth jungles were very evident in the fields. After visiting these fields I will take a PRE that has given out any day. Continue reading

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Destroying a Poor Corn Stand to be Planted Back to Soybean or Cotton

Author: Larry Steckel, Extension Weed Specialist Comments Off on Destroying a Poor Corn Stand to be Planted Back to Soybean or Cotton

Clearly the most frequent call the last few days of April and the first half of May has concerned corn replant.  All through early May the calls have been on how to destroy a partial stand of corn and replant back to corn.  In just the last few days the question has been on how to remove a poor stand of corn and then plant back to soybeans or cotton. Continue reading

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Armyworms in Wheat etc.

Author: Scott Stewart, IPM Extension Specialist Comments Off on Armyworms in Wheat etc.

Be alert for true armyworm infestations in wheat, and these larvae may also migrate into soybean, corn or other crops from adjacent wheat fields of grassy ditch banks. They might even be on weedy grasses or wheat or other grasses used in cover crops, and this could cause a problem if Continue reading

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