Crop Progress – Summarized from NASS

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As reported by NASS on June 24, 2013

 WHEAT HARVEST FINALLY BEGAN

Farmers took advantage of good weather conditions across the state last week and finally began to harvest the wheat crop. Even with 11 percent of the wheat crop being harvested this past week, harvest is still about two weeks behind the five year average. The wheat conditions have been good throughout the spring, but lodging has caused some yield issues. Farmers were also busy switching over from corn to soybeans in fields that had been flooded and needed to be replanted. Cotton is rated in mostly fair-to-good condition, but thrips are wearing on cotton, with some fields needing to be sprayed multiple times. Other farm activities that took place last week include the first cutting of hay and tobacco transplanting.

There were 5 days suitable for field work across the state. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 5 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 4 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 15 percent surplus. Temperatures across the state this week averaged slightly above normal. Precipitation averaged below normal for west and east Tennessee, and the east received above normal rainfall.

Percent   Planted

June 23,   2013

June 16,   2013

June 23,   2012

5 Year   Average

Soybeans

TN

73%

62%

98%

89%

US

92%

85%

99%

95%

 

Crop   Condition %

June 23,   2013

Very   Poor

Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Corn

TN

0%

5%

17%

56%

22%

US

2%

6%

27%

51%

14%

Cotton

TN

1%

8%

26%

50%

15%

US

6%

17%

34%

35%

8%

Soybeans

TN

0%

4%

15%

66%

15%

US

2%

5%

28%

54%

11%

Pasture

TN

0%

2%

17%

68%

13%

US

8%

15%

24%

42%

11%

 

 

 

Crop   Progress

June 23, 2013June 16,   2013June 23,   20125 Year   Average
Soybeans Emerged

TN

54%

40%

91%

74%

US

81%

66%

98%

89%

Corn – Silking or beyond

TN

6%

0%

67%

31%

US

Cotton Squaring

TN

15%

0%

44%

31%

US

23%

10%

34%

29%

Wheat Harvested

TN

41%

11%

98%

75%

US

20%

11%

63%

37%

 

County Agent Comments

 

Farmers finally get a break in the weather to finish planting corn, soybeans and cotton, with most of their time spent replanting poor stands due to heavy rains. Wheat harvest is well underway with very good yields being reported, most in the 75 bushel+ range. Hay is being cut, stored and cattle are in excellent condition.”  J.C. Dupree, Jr., Lauderdale County

“The farmers in Fayette County were busy planting beans and cutting hay this week. An unexpected shower happened in parts of the County on Wednesday. Corn looks better since we have had warmer weather, some is starting to tassel. Beans and cotton look good too.” Jeffery Via, Fayette County

“Having enough workers and daylight hours to get wheat harvested, cotton and soybeans planted, and corn fertilized is proving to be very challenging.” Walter Battle, Haywood County

“Hit and miss thunderstorms have producers jumping between locations to keep wheat harvest rolling. Some soybean planting has occurred but no-tilling has been tough in wet soil and wheat straw conditions. Wheat yields range from mid-60’s to mid-80’s in most locations. Some hay has been harvested this week as well.” Jeff Lannom, Weakley County

“Wheat harvest began in the county this week. Tobacco farmers made the last push to get the rest of the crop in the ground. Corn looks good except for some scattered stands in wet areas. Hay harvest was behind schedule but most farmers are finishing their first cutting.” Jason Evitts, Trousdale County

“Early soybeans are looking very good. Soybeans following wheat are still in the bag due to late wheat harvest. Wheat harvest has yet to begin but some producers believe they will start harvest next week. Some producers are reporting they are preparing for a second cutting of hay. Just a little tobacco has yet to be set and the tobacco is reported as looking good at this point. Pastures are looking very good except for weeds.” Ruth Correll, Wilson County

“Once again heavy rains at the beginning of the week kept field activities to a minimum. Showers with intermittent downpours Monday thru Thursday produced from 1,5 to 3.5 inches depending on location with a few isolated areas seeing over five inches of rain. Rains have recharged standing water in a number of low areas. A few producers were able to get back into wheat & canola fields on Thursday
afternoon. While producers are able to get the grain out, most are concerned with tracking wet fields and the effect on planting soybeans. About 10% of the corn is showing a tassel, with about 5% with silks emerged. A few acres of second cutting of hay were harvested.”
Ed Burns, Franklin County

“Over 3 inches of rain fell in most portions of the county. First-cutting hay is yet to be finished. Soybean planting continues as field conditions permit.” John Wilson, Blount County

“Still too wet to plant soybeans. Corn looks good. Hay is way too mature-lots of it being cut and baled between rain showers this week.”  John Goddard, Loudon County

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