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06
Aug
2012
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

TOBACCO HARVEST BEGINS

A relatively short dry spell came to a relieving end as scattered showers hit the state at weeks’ end. Pasture conditions continued to slowly improve, and all crops except corn remain mostly in the good category. Cattle are rated exceptionally good as only 9 percent are rated in the very poor-to-poor range. Tobacco harvest is underway as two-thirds of Tennessee’s tobacco has now been topped. Corn, tobacco, and soybeans continue to develop ahead of schedule. Main farm activities last week included hay and silage harvest, tobacco topping, spraying for insects, and fungicide applications.

There were 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork last week. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 11 percent very short, 34 percent short, 52 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 19 percent very short, 37 percent short, 43 percent adequate and 1 percent surplus. Temperatures across the state last week continued to average above normal. Rainfall amounts averaged a little above the norm.

Crop Condition %

August 5, 2012

   

Very Poor

Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Corn

TN

24%

29%

27%

18%

2%

 

US

25%

25%

27%

20%

3%

Cotton

TN

3%

10%

32%

49%

6%

 

US

10%

17%

32%

32%

9%

Soybeans

TN

5%

13%

35%

40%

7%

 

US

16%

23%

32%

25%

4%

Pasture

TN

13%

26%

39%

21%

1%

 

US

31%

28%

25%

14%

2%

 

 Condition Definitions

v Very Poor - Extreme degree of loss to yield potential, complete or near crop failure. Pastures provide very little or no feed considering the time of year. Supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

v Poor - Heavy degree of loss of yield potential which can be caused by excess soil moisture, drought, disease, etc. Pastures are providing only marginal feed for the current time of year. Some supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

v Fair - Less than normal crop condition. Yield loss is a possibility but the extent is unknown. Pastures are providing generally adequate feed but still less than normal for the time of year.

v Good - Yield prospects are normal or above normal. Moisture levels are adequate with only light disease and insect damage. Pastures are providing adequate feed supplies for the current time of year.

v Excellent - Yield prospects are above normal and crops are experiencing little or no stress. Pastures are supplying feed in excess of what is normally expected at the current time of year.

 

Crop Progress

   

August 5, 2012

  July 29, 2012

August 5, 2011

5 Year Average
Corn Silking

TN

100%

99%

99%

99%

 

US

98%

94%

90%

90%

Corn Dough

TN

94%

88%

76%

82%

 

US

61%

37%

27%

30%

Corn Dented

TN

71%

54%

46%

48%

 

US

26%

13%

6%

7%

Corn Mature

TN

11%

-

3%

3%

 

US

6%

-

2%

2%

Soybeans Blooming

TN

90%

84%

82%

84%

 

US

93%

88%

84%

85%

Soybeans Setting Pods

TN

72%

59%

55%

62%

 

US

71%

55%

46%

53%

Cotton Squaring

TN

100%

97%

99%

100%

 

US

98%

93%

93%

94%

Cotton Setting Bolls

TN

80%

70%

81%

86%

 

US

74%

59%

74%

70%

Cotton Bolls Opening

TN

-

-

-

1%

 

US

9%

-

9%

7%

 

County Agent Comments

 “County continues to remain extremely dry in most areas. A few scattered showers over the past 5 to 7 days has given crops some temporary relief. Still in need of rainfall in tremendous way. Fungicide applications have been applied to some soybean acres. Cotton producers are still spraying for plant bugs in cotton. A few acres of corn are being harvested this week but for most corn acres it is still a bit early yet. Expecting to see more corn harvest activity by the 3rd week of August, earliest ever in the 20+ years I have been involved with county row crop production. Am hoping to average 100 bushels per acre in corn but may be a bit optimistic. Need rain.” Tim Campbell, Dyer County

Another hot, dry week has taken its toll on thirsty soybeans and pastures. Scattered thunderstorms late week dropped varying moisture levels. Those areas fortunate enough to have received rainfall will see soybeans and pastures perk up.”  Jeff Lannom, Weakley County

“A couple days of rain were a welcome sight after conditions were beginning to get dry again. Soybeans and pastures were looking much better at week’s end. A second cutting of hay is looking much more likely now for some producers.” Calvin Bryant, Lawrence County

“Hot and humid weather continues with isolated showers throughout the week producing from .75 to 1.25 inches of rain. The heaviest rain totals came at the week’s end and mostly in the southern and western portions of the County. Producers continue to harvest corn in isolated areas with early yield reports around 80 bushels per acre. Soybeans continue to look good with little disease and insect pressure. Warm season pastures doing well, producers harvesting warm season grasses for hay.” Ed Burns, Franklin County

“Had some bad weather this week on the southern plateau that caused lots of damage to large trees. Also hail damage to some nursery crops and thousands of dollars damage to one large commercial vegetable operation.”  Creig Kimbro, Grundy County

“Crabgrass and Johnson grass growing due to rain 2 weeks ago. Many springs and ponds still dry. Soybeans showed some improvements then dry weather has slowed them again. Late corn shows some promise.” Scott Chadwell, Putnam County

“Significant improvement all across the board due to recent rains.” Mannie Bedwell, Hamblen County

“Corn Grain Harvest started today. Averages around 75 bu./ac. Some light showers have helped late corn. Beans are uneven and need more rain. Some hay was baled this week. More hay (Johnsongrass) will go up next week if weather permits.”  John Goddard, Loudon County

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