Find it Here
Twitter update
RSS AgNews
Newsletter

Quick Links
Agricultural Programs
07
May
2012
Crop Progress
Author: Chuck Danehower, Extension Area Specialist - Farm Management Comments Off

As reported by NASS on May 7, 2012

 

SCATTERED SHOWERS PROVIDE LITTLE RELIEF

Unusually high temperatures and sunny days combined to minimize the benefits of scattered showers that fell in many areas across the state. Reporters in all regions reiterated the need for a general soaking rain. Row crops were holding on with three-fourths of the corn and winter wheat acres rated in good-to-excellent condition. Crop development continues to advance well ahead of the normal pace. Pastures declined some from the previous week, but cattle were reported to be mostly good condition. Other farm activities this week included post-emergence herbicide and fertilizer applications, cutting hay, scouting for insects and diseases, harvesting strawberries, and continued assessment of freeze damage on fruit crops.

There were 6.5 days suitable for fieldwork across the state. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 13 percent very short, 34 percent short, 52 percent adequate and 1 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 7 percent very short, 35 percent short, 57 percent adequate and 1 percent surplus. Temperatures across the state averaged well above normal. Rainfall amounts averaged below normal across the state despite hit or miss thunderstorms that developed this past week.

Percent Planted

   

May 6, 2012

April 29, 2012

May 6, 2011

5 Year Average

Corn

TN

98%

93%

41%

74%

 

US

53%

28%

12%

27%

Cotton

TN

29%

6%

2%

10%

 

US

36%

26%

24%

28%

Soybeans

TN

23%

9%

1%

6%

 

US

24%

12%

6%

11%

 

Crop Condition %

May 6, 2012

   

Very Poor

Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Winter Wheat

TN

1%

5%

19%

49%

26%

 

US

4%

8%

25%

48%

15%

Corn

TN

0%

4%

20%

60%

16%

 

US

 

Crop Progress

   

May 6,  2012

  April 29, 2012

May 6, 2011

5 Year Average
Corn –Emerged

TN

92%

75%

27%

48%

 

US

32%

15%

6%

13%

Soybeans – Emerged

TN

5%

 

US

7%

2%

3%

County Agent Comments

 “Depending on the part of the county you live in, crop condition were at both extremes of the spectrum. On the north end of the county around the Gates, Halls area and bordering Dyer County due to recent rains last week crop conditions on corn and wheat were very favorable. However, on the South end of the county, Ripley and Henning area, conditions were becoming dry. Corn was twisting and newly planted corn and beans were in desperate need of a rain. On Sunday May 6th, the majority of the county received on average three quarter of an inch of rain. Overall crop condition and pasture condition are favorable.” J. C. Dupree, Lauderdale County

“Producers have been busy side-dressing corn with nitrogen, applying post-emerge herbicides on corn and planting soybeans. Hay producers have taken advantage of the dry weather and have harvested most of the first cutting of forage crops.” Jeff Lannom, Weakley County

“Some of the early planted corn, wheat, hay, and pastures are starting to suffer from lack of moisture. We really need a good soaking rain.” Ronnie Barron, Cheatham County

“Giles County finally got some rain this week. Most reports from 3 to 5 tenths. Corn planting about done. Some soybean producers have been waiting on rain to start back planting beans. Lower than normal hay yields being reported.”  Kevin Rose, Giles County  

“Our hay is yielding 30 to 50%. Pastures are looking bad. Wheat has leaves drying up and turning early. Young corn and beans are suffering.” Larry Moorehead, Moore County 

“Continued dry weather is causing concerns and effecting crop planting and progress. Passing showers produced rain on Thursday ranging from 0.10 to 0.20, which is the first measurable rainfall many areas have seen in three weeks. Planting has halted waiting on moisture to return. The (wheat) crop is turning and showing signs of ripening, dry weather is affecting grain fill. The (corn) crop is basically planted with the exception of a few silage acres. The crop is holding its own; however, stands are thin on droughty spots in the field. Dry weather has halted (cotton) planting, 75% of the crop is planted with 20% emerged.” Ed Burns, Franklin County 

“First cutting hay getting started but may be a little light in quantity. Some light rain early Sat. morning but needing much more. Tobacco transplant is getting underway.” Scott Chadwell, Putnam County

“First cutting hay is progressing ahead of normal. Small shower on Thursday just settled the dust. Very dry and pastures are starting to look bad. Producers are already concerned about the growing season.” Kim Frady, Bradley County

“Freeze damage on fruit much more severe than first thought. Most of the blackberry crop lost. Much of the grape crop lost. 60 – 70% loss on peaches. Apple loss around 30%.” Neal Denton, Knox County

Print Friendly
 

Comments are closed.